Attention Recruits: "Free Ride" May Be Misleading

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Just a heads up to all talented and hard-working athletes looking to enter college: a "full scholarship" might not provide as much as it implies.

A recent study at Ithaca College shows that the average Division I athlete with "full coverage" still pays $2,951 a year in subsidiary school-related expenses, such as campus parking fees and materials required for classes.

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Just a heads up to all talented and hard-working athletes looking to enter college: a "full scholarship" might not provide as much as it implies.

A recent study at Ithaca College shows that the average Division I athlete with "full coverage" still pays $2,951 a year in subsidiary school-related expenses, such as campus parking fees and materials required for classes.

If you are a candidate for a full-ride scholarship, you may want to inquire about students' average out-of-pocket expenses. If they are hefty, we encourage you to apply for a Federal Pell Grant, or seek other need-based aid opportunities. (But steer clear of sports agents willing to illegally shell out money.)

The NCAA recently supported eight different proposals allowing athletes to secure additional merit- and need-based financial aid. None would affect the rest of the team's dollar limits for athletic scholarships. But regardless, make sure your potential schools disclose information about the full cost of attending, as well as precise details and conditions of your future contract.

Source:  espn.com

Photo:  bigislandchronicle.com


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: SPORTS | AGENTS | SCHOLARSHIPS | FINANCIAL AID | ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS