You Should Eat the Peel of These 15 Fruits and Vegetables

Read about the nutritional benefits of the peel or skin of 15 fruits and veggies and learn how to make them more palatable.

Banana

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Banana

A banana's peel contains way more fiber than its flesh, and is likewise richer in potassium.

The peel also contains lutein, a powerful antioxidant that plays a role in maintaining healthy eye function.

An amino acid called tryptophan is more highly concentrated in the peel than the insides.

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A banana's peel contains way more fiber than its flesh, and is likewise richer in potassium.

The peel also contains lutein, a powerful antioxidant that plays a role in maintaining healthy eye function.

An amino acid called tryptophan is more highly concentrated in the peel than the insides.

Among other things, tryptophan is believed to ease depression by increasing the body's levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that affects mood.

Although the peel has a bitter taste and tough, ropey consistency most people aren't used to, an overripe banana (brown or black) becomes thinner, sweeter and easier to chew.

You can also put the peel (ripe or overripe) through a juicer with the rest of the banana.

Or you can boil the peel for several minutes to make it softer, or throw it in the frying pan.

If you want to get really creative, bake a banana peel in the oven for 20 minutes or so, or until it becomes dried out, then use it to make tea.

6 Amazing Benefits Of Eating a Banana Every Day

Photo Credit: iStock


Topics: FIBER | FRUIT | POTASSIUM | NUTRIENTS | VITAMIN C | WATERMELON