You Should Eat the Peel of These 15 Fruits and Vegetables

Read about the nutritional benefits of the peel or skin of 15 fruits and veggies and learn how to make them more palatable.

Oranges

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Oranges

The peel of an orange packs in twice as much vitamin C as what's inside.

It also contains higher concentrations of riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium and potassium.

The peel's flavonoids have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. (Citrus fruit also boosts iron absorption.)

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The peel of an orange packs in twice as much vitamin C as what's inside.

It also contains higher concentrations of riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium and potassium.

The peel's flavonoids have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. (Citrus fruit also boosts iron absorption.)

As nutritious as citrus peels are, you're unlikely to start eating oranges whole.

The entire peel is bitter and difficult to digest.

Instead, grate the peel using a microplane or another tool and sprinkle it on top of salads, or in a vinaigrette dressing.

Citrus shavings make a good pairing with ice cream and chocolate as well.

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Topics: FIBER | FRUIT | POTASSIUM | NUTRIENTS | VITAMIN C | WATERMELON