How To Set Up Online Training

Get better at the sports you play and the life you lead at STACK. Improve your training, nutrition and lifestyle with daily

With the world flipping upside down in the past year - virtual school, virtual work, virtual meet-ups with friends, and virtual training - many have had to adapt swiftly to the times.

The old model is dying fast in all facets of life. People are becoming more attracted to the convenience and flexibility that the virtual world provides.

In the training space, performance coaches were forced to spend several months away from the facility land shift to more offerings on Zoom. Using strength and conditioning phone apps to keep their athletes physically healthy and mentally balanced.

Read More >>

With the world flipping upside down in the past year - virtual school, virtual work, virtual meet-ups with friends, and virtual training - many have had to adapt swiftly to the times.

The old model is dying fast in all facets of life. People are becoming more attracted to the convenience and flexibility that the virtual world provides.

In the training space, performance coaches were forced to spend several months away from the facility land shift to more offerings on Zoom. Using strength and conditioning phone apps to keep their athletes physically healthy and mentally balanced.

When the first quarantine began, everyone was motivated to work out on their own time, in the comfort of their own home, and perhaps in their pajamas. Too, every athlete realized that return to play could happen at any moment, so they needed to continue some training to come back less susceptible to injury.

We cannot ignore the mental piece; too many athletes during this time simply needed a routine to keep them sane in a world of isolation.

Now many performance coaches are keeping the momentum remotely because it provides a service that offers the following benefits:

Affordable: online training rates across the board are far cheaper than in-person sessions.

Flexible: online training programs are written to fit the individual athlete's schedule.

Convenient: online training allows for no commute to the facility and the ability to do work out at any time of day.

Productive: online training is just as effective as in-person, especially if the coach delivers a quality, engaging service.

Young Football Soccer Player on Training With New Technology. New Technology in Soccer Training. Sports Athlete Running Ball. Tablet Device in the Background. Technology in today's Football

Young Football Soccer Player on Training With New Technology. New Technology in Soccer Training. Sports Athlete Running Ball. Tablet Device in the Background. Technology in today's Football

Productivity Of Online Training Programs

To set up online training, you need to search for a coach who has a long history of training in-person clients first.

The last thing you want is to work with a charlatan who looks good on social media yet has no body of work to back up their offerings.

If you start searching on the web, on their Instagram, or Twitter, be sure they share videos of their athletes. Are they coaching the specific population you are seeking training for? Are they highlighting their athletes' accomplishments and physical improvements? Are they in alignment with your values? Are they cool to hang out with on Zoom for an hour?

Once you pick someone who jives with you, the initial call is critical to diving more in-depth on what to expect when working with them. Just like in-person training, there needs to be some form of initial evaluation that serves as a benchmark for your improvements along the way. If they do not have one, run.

Other questions to ask:

  • Did they ask about your injury history?
  • Did they ask about your training age and exercise background?
  • Did they ask about your schedule?
  • Did they ask what motivates you?
  • Did they ask about your lifestyle?

The trainer needs to be interviewing you as much as you are interviewing them. Remember, your body is in the hands of someone far away, so they better be meticulous in their approach.

When you solidify who you are working with, many trainers will offer several options to suit your needs. Some athletes just want the program written. Some need more accountability and check-ins. However, suppose a client is new to training. In that case, the trainer should recommend more engagement in the beginning to teach movement patterns and lifting techniques.

Eventually, the client gets so adept in the process, they reach amazing heights just as much as they would in-person training. There is an immense sense of fulfillment for the athlete that they had autonomy in their routine and did a good chunk of it independently.

Remote Athlete 30lb Pull

It is worth repeating that with online training, a lot of amazing feats of strength can be accomplished if the trainer and athlete have a balanced relationship - the trainer being the facilitator, and the athlete being the self, intrinsic motivator.

Online training is only for those who are in fact intrinsically motivated to some degree. They thrive in a setting that allows them to be independent, with a few check-ins here and there to circle back on progress on ensuring everyone is still moving well.

Single-Leg Broad Jump Remote Training

The online training model can be a rewarding one for both parties and save everyone in a busy world. Be sure to be picky in your approach when you hire a trainer and get clear on who you are and if you are okay with motivating yourself along the way.

Read More

Your At-Home Workout's Biggest Mistakes


Topics: AT-HOME WORKOUT | COVID